Genesee Peregrine Camera

Species Info

Thanks again to AltaLink for their generous partnership of this live streaming video that attracts Canadian and international viewers. We'd also like to thank the following sponsors and the organizations that also helped make this viewing opportunity possible: Aspen Properties, TeraGo, WiBand, Capital Power, and Nutrien.

Want to know what's happening with the falcons? Click a date below!

June 15, 2021

As the season progresses, our hopes for a peregrine pair to settle at the Genesee nest box dim. Keep in mind, peregrines have opted to nest inother areas of the Power Plant (i.e., venting area, fan shroud,and explosion shoot) in the past. So, there could still be peregrines at the Genesee Power Plant—we just can’t watch them on camera. We hope that they have successfully nested.

The facts: Peregrine falcons commonly change their nesting location on cliffs that they defend; however, experts have noted the situation is a little different regarding nesting boxes. The birds find their nesting box superior to other locations, and typically change nesting locations far less than in a “natural” environment.

May 28, 2021

Unfortunately, a peregrine pair has not settled yet at Genesee Power Plant this year. At this point, we can only speculate as to why. Here’s hoping a pair chooses this location as their seasonal nest next year.

May 4, 2021

We continue to see peregrines checking out the Genesee Power Plant nest box, but they haven’t settled yet.

Here’s an interesting fact about the peregrine’s nesting habit: they do not construct their nest, but “scrape” dirt, gravel, or debris on a structure or use ready-to-move-in abandoned nests.

April 23, 2021

Peregrines have been spotted! They could just be checking out the site, they could be settling in for the season, they could still be battling for the site - the coming days will determine the outcome. Stay tuned to find out if this pair will nest at Genesee Power Plant for the season.

Seasonal Summary: 2020

The unidentified peregrine pair at Bell Tower were ahead of the pack again this year! Two eggs were laid at the end of April. Since they were so good at brooding, we didn’t notice that there were four eggs in total until they all hatched in early June. After the biologists banded the four chicks in July, they moved the two females to the Pembina release site to increase their chances of survival.

Species at Risk

Although the peregrine falcon and the ferruginous hawk get a lot of attention because they are obviously excessively cool, there are many other interesting species that are considered to be Species at Risk. Why not learn about them? For example, the greater sage grouse is a very unique looking upland bird and there are very few left in Alberta. Also check out some of the bat conservation initiatives in Alberta.

Want to see more? Check out these Species at Risk Conservation Stories, or find more Species at Risk publications and resources.

Looking for more? Check out the Ferruginous Hawks!