Nutrien Peregrine Camera

 

Thanks again to AltaLink for their generous partnership of this live streaming video that attracts Canadian and international viewers. We'd also like to thank the following sponsors and the organizations that also helped make this viewing opportunity possible: Aspen Properties, TeraGo, WiBand, Capital Power, and Nutrien.

Want to know what's happening with the falcons? Click a date below!

July 27, 2021

We have some very unfortunate news at Nutrien. Both the young male and female peregrine falcons died suddenly yesterday. The wildlife biologist has removed the birds and will be conducting a necropsy to see if they can determine the cause of death.

July 15, 2021

The chicks are growing up so quickly! Can you believe that they are already 4 weeks old? Which means that the chicks were ready for banding. While the biologists carefully banded all four of the chicks on July 13, they also hydrated the chicks, dusted the nest for ectoparasites, added a new layer of gravel, and cleaned the camera (thank you very much!).

As most of our viewers noticed, two of the chicks were missing after the banding. Where did they go? They were removed and taken to the Pembina hack site. Rest assured, the chicks are alive and well, and will fledge when they are ready in a safe environment.For more information regarding this decision and process, please refer to the ACA webpage: https://www.ab-conservation.com/wildlife-cameras/peregrine/some-peregrine-chicks-are-missing/

July 6, 2021

Last week’s heat wave was a rough one, but the peregrines and their chicks persevered through it. Luckily, the nest box provides fantastic shade for the young, and if that’s not enough, the female adult peregrine will provide it. The biggest concern at this age is exposure to prolonged rain.

June 22, 2021

As of the evening on June 18, Nutrien has 4 chicks! The adults are diligently taking turns keeping the chicks warm and fed.

Unfortunately, the video is a bit foggy as the camera lens is dirty, likely from natural debris. However, the birds can still be seen.

June 16, 2021

After an incubation exchange, one of the adult falcons was spotted repositioning the 3 eggs in the nest. Peregrines roll the eggs frequently (either every shift change or every hour or so) to ensure the eggs are warmed evenly, and to ensure the unborn chicks receive optimal nutrients from their embryonic membranes to grow and develop. Closer to hatching, the female peregrine typically turns the eggs more frequently. Stay tuned to see if she is turning them more; we could be seeing chicks very soon!

May 28, 2021

Brooding seems to be going well at Nutrien. The peregrines are taking turns protecting the eggs from the strong winds and chilly weather.

May 11, 2021

We have some exciting and unexpected news at Nutrien: 3 eggs have been laid! Though the birds were only seen sporadically and we didn't see them settle, they have clearly made this nest their home for the season.

May 4, 2021

Peregrines have been spotted! One falcon was even seen sitting in the nest for the afternoon. However, they haven’t seemed to settle yet. Stay tuned as a peregrine pair will be looking to lay their eggs in this nest box very soon.

April 23, 2021

Though there is no action yet from the peregrines on camera, it doesn't mean that there isn't anything going on behind the scenes. As falcons have been spotted throughout the city, there's a chance that there are peregrines fighting for this nesting site. Stay tuned to see which pair wins the battle for the Nutrien site.

Seasonal Summary: 2020

The young, unidentified peregrine pair at Nutrien faced struggles and adversity this year. Though they had successfully laid 2 eggs, and despite the tiercel’s great efforts to brood, the eggs were not viable. Though the female won the site in a violent battle with another female peregrine mid-May, the fight was detrimental to her breeding attempt for the year.

Species at Risk

Although the peregrine falcon and the ferruginous hawk get a lot of attention because they are obviously excessively cool, there are many other interesting species that are considered to be Species at Risk. Why not learn about them? For example, the greater sage grouse is a very unique looking upland bird and there are very few left in Alberta. Also check out some of the bat conservation initiatives in Alberta.

Want to see more? Check out these Species at Risk Conservation Stories, or find more Species at Risk publications and resources.

Looking for more? Check out the Ferruginous Hawks!